Roses or Thorns? – The Affirmation Spot for Friday December 12, 2008

Today’s thought:

“When you go to a garden do you look at thorns or flowers? Spend more time with roses and jasmine.”
~Rumi

jasmine1Today’s quote comes from the 13th century Persian Poet named Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī or Rumi for short.Rumi was a Sufi mystic and a prolific poet whose work has survived and weathered well into the 21st century.

Rumi reminds us that there are two ways to look at any situation. A rose is a beautiful flower, but it also laced with sharp thorns. The question is what are we focused on? Our lives are like that garden. Every day there are roses and thorns and we have a choice which we will spend our time thinking about, talking about, and acting upon.

It’s easy to get caught up in the thorns and miss the flowers – their beauty and sweet smells – completely. The choice each and every day is yours. Will you fill this day with flowers or thorns?

Stay inspired!

Ray

Farewell, Winter – The Affirmation Spot for Wednesday March 19, 2008

Thank you for visiting The Affirmation Spot. Your comments on the blog or this article are always welcome. What do you think? Please click here to comment on today’s blog.




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Take your positive thoughts with you wherever you go. During the month of March Download any two mp3 affirmations from The Affirmation Spot.com and get a third mp3 affirmation free.There are no limits! Simply type the word “blog” into the coupon field at checkout. Thanks for getting your audio affirmations at The Affirmation Spot! Click here to view, hear excerpts, or download affirmations.Today’s featured affirmation is:

“I am reminding myself that I am a great poet and I get better and better each and every day.” (repeats 6 times)
“The universe reminds you that you are a great poet and I get better and better each and every day.” (repeats 6 times)

Hear an audio mp3 version of this affirmation right now.


Juanita R. Davis

Juanita R. Davis – my paternal grandmother – was born on December 18, 1904. Despite debilitating conditions that began very early in life, she lived life with an undeniable vigor and spunk.

Later in life she became a prolific writer and poet. She was published in numerous newspapers and regional magazines.

 She died in October 1988. Before she left this world she inspired me in ways she knew and in ways neither she nor I can understand. Certainly, I write because of her. All these years later, she remains one of the steady influences on my life.

As we get ready to say goodbye to winter, I decided to share one grandma’s many poems. It fully displays her ironic sense of humor and desbribes the unpredictability of the weather during our uneasy transition from winter to spring.

She titled it “We Take It As It Comes”.

“We Take It As It Comes”

There’s no accumulation
Was what forecasters said
There’s no accumulation
So had naught to dread.


I crawled beneath the covers
And went right off to sleep
The “no accumulation”
Is now six inches deep.


Today I made a pathway
Almost a sidewalk wide
With “no accumulation”
Piled high on either side.

Be peaceful Be positive Be prosperous!

Ray

The Affirmation Spot.com

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The Prophet: “Freedom” by Kahlil Gibran

Today’s Thought:

Our world needs vision; it needs visionaries. Why not you and yours?

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Truly, Kahlil Gibran stands among the most intriguing voices ever to scratch words onto a page. His mystically beautiful and profoundly poetic prose burns to the very root of what it means to be human. He masterfully tackles issues we are all warned not to talk about and gently illuminates the darkness that separates the sides.

Gibran was born in Lebanon in 1883. In 1912, he moved to New York where he pursued his writing and art. Most consider The Prophet, published in 1923, to be his crowning achievement.  The work is a series of 28 short essays depicting an unnamed prophet answering the peoples’ questions about important issues in life.

Gibran’s writings are noted for their intricate wording that invites the reader to ponder their deeper meaning and link the ideas to his or her own life. He died an untimely death in 1931, but his work remains popular and relevant in a modern world seeking answers.

Freedom is one of the 28 essays from The Prophet. Few concepts resonate as resolutely in our 21st century world as freedom. Peoples the world over living under dictators, theocracies, and other repressive regimes still fight for their freedom. Meanwhile, the people in “free nations” struggle against the onslaught of intrusive technologies and power hungry governments to keep their freedom from being swallowed whole.

Internally, we are constantly fighting our own personal battle against the impediments to freedom that we construct in our own lives.

Gibran offers gems that set you on the road to freedom. Read his writing through a couple of times as it always yields more than the first reading. Recognizing the chains, within and without, is the first step on the road to true freedom.

“Freedom”

And an orator said, “Speak to us of Freedom.”

And he (the prophet) answered: At the city gate and by your fireside I have seen you prostrate yourself and worship your own freedom, Even as slaves humble themselves before a tyrant and praise him though he slays them.

Aye, in the grove of the temple and in the shadow of the citadel I have seen the freest among you wear their freedom as a yoke and a handcuff.

And my heart bled within me; for you can only be free when even the desire of seeking freedom becomes a harness to you, and when you cease to speak of freedom as a goal and a fulfillment.

You shall be free indeed when your days are not without a care nor your nights without a want and a grief, But rather when these things girdle your life and yet you rise above them naked and unbound.

And how shall you rise beyond your days and nights unless you break the chains which you at the dawn of your understanding have fastened around your noon hour?

In truth that which you call freedom is the strongest of these chains, though its links glitter in the sun and dazzle your eyes.

And what is it but fragments of your own self you would discard that you may become free? If it is an unjust law you would abolish, that law was written with your own hand upon your own forehead.

You cannot erase it by burning your law books nor by washing the foreheads of your judges, though you pour the sea upon them. And if it is a despot you would dethrone, see first that his throne erected within you is destroyed.

For how can a tyrant rule the free and the proud, but for a tyranny in their own freedom and a shame in their own pride? And if it is a care you would cast off, that care has been chosen by you rather than imposed upon you.

And if it is a fear you would dispel, the seat of that fear is in your heart and not in the hand of the feared.

Verily all things move within your being in constant half embrace, the desired and the dreaded, the repugnant and the cherished, the pursued and that which you would escape.

These things move within you as lights and shadows in pairs that cling. And when the shadow fades and is no more, the light that lingers becomes a shadow to another light.

And thus your freedom when it loses its fetters becomes itself the fetter of a greater freedom.

Copyright @ Kahlil Gibran.

Follow your bliss. Experience your bliss. Become your bliss.

Ray

Ray Davis is the founder of The Affirmation Spot. He’s been studying and practicing personal development for 30 years. He’s also studied many of the world’s spiritual traditions and mythologies.

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A Psalm of Life – The Affirmation Spot for Wednesday January 30, 2008

longfellow.jpgHenry Wadsworth Longfellow was born on February 27, 1807 in Portland, Maine. His famous works include “Paul Revere’s Ride”, “The Song of Hiawatha”, “Evangeline”, and “Christmas Bells”.  Of course, his immortalization of Paul Revere is by far his most famous. What American school child in the last 130 years has not memorized:










Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April in seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year…

…One; if by land, And two; if by sea
And i on the opposite shore will be
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
To every middlesex village and farm
For the country folk to be up and arm.

Today, however, we feature another of Mr. Longfellow’s most stirring works. It’s a poem and and an affirmation all at the same time. The final stanza is often quoted as an affirmation, but the whole poem will light a fire under your mid winter Wednesday.

“A Psalm of Life”

What The Heart Of The Young Man Said To The Psalmist.

Tell me not, in mournful numbers,
Life is but an empty dream!-
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not what they seem.


Life is real! Life is earnest!
And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
Was not spoken of the soul.


Not enjoyment, and not sorrow,
Is our destined end or way;
But to act, that each to-morrow
Find us farther than to-day.


Art is long, and Time is fleeting,
And our hearts, though stout and brave,
Still, like muffled dreams are beating
Funeral marches to the grave.


In the world’s broad field of battle,
In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle!
Be a hero in the strife!


Trust no future, howe’er pleasant!
Let the dead Past bury its dead!
Act – act in the living Present!
Heart within, and God o’erhead!


Lives of great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time;


Footprints, that perhaps another,
Sailing o’er life’s solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
Seeing, shall take heart again.


Let us, then, be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and learn to wait.




Be peaceful Be prosperous!


Ray

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