15 Buddha Quotes to Live By – Day 251 of 365 Days to a Better You

Siddhartha Gautama, better known to the world as the Buddha, was born a prince in northern India about 2600 years ago. His father was told his son would either be a world king or a great spiritual teacher. Wishing his son to expand the power of his kingdom, King Suddhodana ordered that he be immersed in the richest worldly pleasures to prevent him from pursuing the spiritual path.

However, at 29, Siddhartha was exposed to illness, aging, and death. These were all forbidden knowledge to him. His charioteer, against orders, explained that all human beings, including one day the young prince, experience these things. Then he saw a monk and was awakened to his true life’s purpose. The rest, as they say, is history.

Beginning with his famous Fire Sermon, the Tathagata taught for 47 years. He left us a wealth of wisdom. Here are 15 quotes we can all apply to our lives.

All these centuries later, these words are easy to read, but the challenge of a lifetime to live.

  1. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: we are formed and molded by our thoughts. Those whose minds are shaped by selfish thoughts cause misery when they speak or act. Sorrows roll over them as the wheels of a cart roll over the tracks of the bullock that draws it. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: we are formed and molded by our thoughts. Those whose minds are shaped by selfless thoughts give joy whenever they speak or act. Joy follows them like a shadow that never leaves them.
  2. Let none find fault with others. Let none see the commissions and omissions of others. But, let one see one’s open acts done and undone.
  3. A mind unruffled by the vagaries of fortune, from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, from fear liberated — this is the greatest blessing.
  4. Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will develop and cultivate the liberation of mind by lovingkindness, make it our vehicle, make it our basis, stabilize it, exercise ourselves in it, and fully perfect it.’ Thus should you train yourselves.
  5. Radiate boundless love toward the entire world.
  6. Some do not understand that we must die. But those who do realize this settle their quarrels immediately.
  7. All conditioned things are impermanent’ — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering.
  8. Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by little, fills himself with good.
  9. Irrigators channel waters. Fletchers straighten arrows. Carpenters shape wood. The wise master themselves.
  10. Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal.
  11. The way is not in the sky. The way is in the heart.
  12. Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.
  13. If you understood the power of giving as I do, you would never let a meal pass without sharing.
  14. The root of suffering is attachment.
  15. The greats of the past only show the way. You must walk the path yourself.

Namaste, my friends, namaste!

Ray

Ray Davis is the founder of The Affirmation Spot. He’s been studying and practicing personal development for 30 years. He’s also studied many of the world’s spiritual traditions and mythologies.

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Poem: Ultimate Reality

There are many ways to view the deeper nature of the reality around us.

I wrote this poem in 1993, as one way of seeing that reality.

It expresses the sense of wholeness, devoid of our individual personalities, that underlies the nature of our existence.

It’s a bit existential with some Buddhist overtones. I hope you enjoy and that it makes you think.

“Ultimate Reality”

Cling not to what is fleeting
All is fleeting, therefore, cling not.
Matter and energy, time and space
Are but reflections in the void.

Desire nothing and everything shall you attain
Have everything and, in truth, nothing is yours.
For no holder is there and nothing held;
And nothing to hold, only unity.

I am but a process in gentle progress; simply
Inter-connected energy flowing in a manner
Created by what has come to pass,
Its interaction bringing forth the future.

No self may be found behind the process,
Only a conscious part of a greater whole
Moving back and forth as far as may be seen
Yet, verily, never having moved at all.

Copyright 1993 Ray Davis

Follow your bliss. Experience your bliss. Become your bliss.

Ray

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Flower Insights from Thich Nhat Hanh – The Affirmation Spot for Wednesday October 5, 2011

Today’s Thought:

“To see a world in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower, Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, And eternity in an hour.”
~ William Blake

Today’s entry is an extended passage from one of my all-time favorite books. This book meant so much to me at a time in my life when I was struggling. The book is Peace Is Every Step by the esteemed Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh. There is much wisdom here. Just for today practice being fully here.

There is a story about a flower which is well known in the Zen circles. One day the Buddha held up a flower in front of an audience of 1250 monks and nuns. He did not say anything for quite a long time. The audience was perfectly silent.

Everyone seemed to be thinking hard, trying to see the meaning behind the Buddha’s gesture. Then, suddenly, the Buddha smiled. He smiled because someone in the audience smiled at him and at the flower. The name of the at monk was Mahakashyapa.

He was the only person who smiled, and the Buddha smiled back and said, ” I have a treasure of insight, and I have transmitted it to Mahakashyapa.”

The story has been discussed by many generations of Zen students, and people continue to look for its meaning. To me the meaning is quite simple. When someone holds up a flower and shows it to you. He want you to see it. If you keep thinking, you miss the follower. The person who was not thinking, who was just himself, was able to encounter the flower in depth, and he smiled.

That is the problem of life. If we are not fully ourselves, truly in the present moment, we miss everything. When a child presents himself to you with his smile, if you are not really there thinking about the future or the past, or preoccupied with other problems then the child is not really there for you. The technique of being alive is to go back to yourself in order for the child to appear like a marvelous reality. Then you can see him smile and you can embrace him in your arms.

I would like to share a poem with you, written by a friend of mine who died at the age of twenty-eight in Saigon, about thirty years ago. After he died, people found many beautiful poems he had written, and I was startled when I read this poem. It has just a few short lines, but it is very beautiful:

Standing quietly by the fence,
You smile your wondrous smile.
I am speechless, and my senses are filled
By the sounds of your beautiful song,
Beginingless and endless.
I bow deeply to you.

“You” refers to a flower, a dahlia. That morning as he passed by a fence, he saw that little flower very deeply and, struck by the sight of it, he stopped and wrote that poem.

I enjoy this poem very much. You might think that the poet was a mystic, because his way of looking and seeing things is very deep. But he was just an ordinary person like any one of us. I don’t know how or why he was able to look and see like that, but it is exactly the way we practice mindfulness. We try to be in touch with life and look deeply as we drink our tea, walk, sit down, or arrange flowers. The secret of the success is that you are really yourself, and when you are really yourself, you can encounter life in the present moment.

Thich Nhat Hanh
Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life (pages 42-44)

Follow your bliss! Experience your bliss! Become your bliss!

Ray

Ray Davis is the Founder of The Affirmation Spot and focuses on empowering minds to think positively, achieve goals, and live dreams. He is author of the ebook The Power to Be You and the forthcoming The Power to Be You 2: 1001 Power Thoughts for Daily Life.

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Inter-Being – The Affirmation Spot for Saturday May 15, 2010

Thich Nhat Hanh was nominated for the 1968 Nobel Peace Prize by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He did not win the Nobel, but it was a great honor nonetheless.  He was banished from his home country Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He led a group of Buddhist monks who were actively seeking peace in their country which invited the disdain of both sides.

“Thay” (teacher), as he is known by his followers, founded a retreat called Plum Village in France. Vietnam’s loss has been the West’s gain. For the past 35 years, Thich Nhat Hanh has taught, written, and spoken on his brand of “Engaged Buddhism” in Europe, the U.S., and around the world.

I first became aware of his work about 20 years ago when I picked up a book titled “Peace is Every Step”. Since I have read many of his other books. One of my favorite passages from any of his books – in fact one my favorite things I’ve ever read – is his brief essay on Inter-being.

Today I’d like to share this beautiful and powerful insight with all of you. I hope it transforms the way you think about the interconnectedness of the people and things around you.

Inter-being

If you are a poet, you will see clearly that there is a cloud floating in this sheet of paper. Without a cloud, there will be no rain; without rain, the trees cannot grow; and without trees, we cannot make paper. The cloud is essential for the paper to exist. If the cloud is not here, the sheet of paper cannot be here either. So we can say that the cloud and the paper inter-are. “Interbeing” is a word that is not in the dictionary yet, but if we combine the prefix “inter-” with the verb “to be,” we ha vea new verb, inter-be. Without a cloud and the sheet of paper inter-are.

If we look into this sheet of paper even more deeply, we can see the sunshine in it. If the sunshine is not there, the forest cannot grow. In fact, nothing can grow. Even we cannot grow without sunshine. And so, we know that the sunshine is also in this sheet of paper. The paper and the sunshine inter-are. And if we continue to look, we can see the logger who cut the tree and brought it to the mill to be transformed into paper. And wesee the wheat. We now the logger cannot exist without his daily bread, and therefore the wheat that became his bread is also in this sheet of paper. And the logger’s father and mother are in it too. When we look in this way, we see that without all of these things, this sheet of paper cannot exist.

Looking even more deeply, we can see we are in it too. This is not difficult to see, because when we look at a sheet of paper, the sheet of paper is part of our perception. Your mind is in here and mine is also. So we can say that everything is in here with this sheet of paper. You cannot point out one thing that is not here-time, space, the earth, the rain, the minerals in the soil, the sunshine, the cloud, the river, the heat. Everything co-exists with this sheet of paper. That is why I think the word inter-be should be in the dictionary. “To be” is to inter-be. You cannot just be by yourself alone. You have to inter-be with every other thing. This sheet of paper is, because everything else is.

Suppose we try to return one of the elements to its source. Suppose we return the sunshine to the sun. Do you think that this sheet of paper will be possible? No, without sunshine nothing can be. And if we return the logger to his mother, then we have no sheet of paper either. The fact is that this sheet of paper is made up only of “non-paper elements.” And if we return these non-paper elements to their sources, then there can be no paper at all. Without “non-paper elements,” like mind, logger, sunshine and so on, there will be no paper. As thin as this sheet of paper is, it contains everything in the universe in it.

Ray

Ray Davis is the founder of The Affirmation Spot and an advocate for the potential of the human race.  He’s the author of the breakthrough novel Anunnaki Awakening: Revelation – order your signed copy today at AATrilogy.com

anunnaki_cover_full_colorAnunnaki Awakening: Revelation is turning heads and opening minds. Humanity’s past is checkered, secret, and dangerous.

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Where Peace Begins – The Affirmation Spot for Tuesday October 13, 2009

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Peace Affirmation: “Peace comes to my world one person at a time beginning with me!”

It is my firm belief that 99% of the people who live on this planet get up every morning and have a desire to live in a peaceful world. They are not interested in struggle, strife, or violence. They want to live their lives, raise their children, and enjoy the richness of community.

The problem that humanity faces is knowing how to get there. Where does this peaceful world emerge? How does it overcome centuries of hatred, constant advertiser pandering to selfishness, and greedy hearts? How do the great faiths and philosophies learn to share this planet together?

S.N. Goenka is one of the great teachers of the Buddhist tradition of Vipassana – “Insight meditation”. His message of non-sectarianism and universality is a beginning to the goals we all seek. Following is a brief excerpt from a speech he gave at a U.N. conference back in 2000. He speaks eloquently of the birthplace of peace in our world.

“Conversion,” Goenka says, “should be from the impurity of the mind to purity of the mind.”

Stay inspired!

Ray

2009 Affirmation

“This year I am absolutely committed to being the person I came here to be!”

Co-Exist – The Affirmation Spot for Thursday July 2, 2009

Ray’s Daily Affirmation:

“Right this moment, I am choosing an open heart over a narrow mind.”
(Download this mp3 affirmation or 100s of others at The Affirmation Spot)




Our world CAN live in unity. We have it within our power to live in peace with each other on this planet. And yet, too often, we choose conflict, anger, and violence. Humanity’s destiny is not written in stone or in a book somewhere. It is written in our hearts, our words, and our choices every day.

It is written in the way we think about each other, talk (or don’t talk) to each other, and act towards each other. Fearful perceptions are reinforced or loving awareness replaces the fear. The world remains stuck where it is or progresses towards a place we all aspire to.

One of the biggest stressers in human relations is our differing ways of worship. For millenia we have fought and killed in the name of God. This was never a particularly wise or productive use of our human, intellectual, spiritual, and material treasure.

Today more than ever we face an increasingly clear choice to learn to get along and share this planet or to destroy ourselves. It really is that simple. One simple mantra serves us well here….”Live and let live.” Is our need to be right so powerful and so insistent that we risk destroying ourselves over it?

Or, can we reach a higher place where I live fully and freely according to my beliefs and allow you to do the same?

Today’s video shows the commonality of our spiritual aspirations. If only we could practice the love, compassion, and empathy that all of our spiritual traditions teach; how much better off we’d be.

Stay inspired!

Ray

2009 Affirmation

“This year I am absolutely committed to being the person I came here to be!”

Buddha Quotations – The Affirmation Spot for Satruday May 16, 2009

Siddhartha Gotama – better known to the world as The Buddha – was born about 563 BCE in Nepal. Nepal was then a part of ancient India. He was born a prince, but gave up his wealth and status to pursue truth and enlightenment.

He has witnessed birth, sickness, old age, and death and wished to find a path whereby humans could escape this cycle of suffering.

After several years of searching and studying under various teachers, Siddhartha sat down beneath a Bodhi Tree. He determined not to move from that spot until he had attained absolute enlightenment.

Mara – the god of deception – appeared before the Buddha and sought divert him from his task. He tempted the Buddha with desire and tried to frighten him with fearful images. Siddhartha was not swayed and attained supreme enlightenment through his discovery of the famous “The Middle Way”.

Today’s video offers many of the Buddha’s most profound quotes. Whether you see these words as spiritual advice or just practical advice, is up to you. My hope is that everyone will find value in these beautiful words.

Stay inspired!

Ray

2009 Affirmation

“This year I am absolutely committed to being the person I came here to be!”