15 Buddha Quotes to Live By – Day 251 of 365 Days to a Better You

Siddhartha Gautama, better known to the world as the Buddha, was born a prince in northern India about 2600 years ago. His father was told his son would either be a world king or a great spiritual teacher. Wishing his son to expand the power of his kingdom, King Suddhodana ordered that he be immersed in the richest worldly pleasures to prevent him from pursuing the spiritual path.

However, at 29, Siddhartha was exposed to illness, aging, and death. These were all forbidden knowledge to him. His charioteer, against orders, explained that all human beings, including one day the young prince, experience these things. Then he saw a monk and was awakened to his true life’s purpose. The rest, as they say, is history.

Beginning with his famous Fire Sermon, the Tathagata taught for 47 years. He left us a wealth of wisdom. Here are 15 quotes we can all apply to our lives.

All these centuries later, these words are easy to read, but the challenge of a lifetime to live.

  1. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: we are formed and molded by our thoughts. Those whose minds are shaped by selfish thoughts cause misery when they speak or act. Sorrows roll over them as the wheels of a cart roll over the tracks of the bullock that draws it. All that we are is the result of what we have thought: we are formed and molded by our thoughts. Those whose minds are shaped by selfless thoughts give joy whenever they speak or act. Joy follows them like a shadow that never leaves them.
  2. Let none find fault with others. Let none see the commissions and omissions of others. But, let one see one’s open acts done and undone.
  3. A mind unruffled by the vagaries of fortune, from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, from fear liberated — this is the greatest blessing.
  4. Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will develop and cultivate the liberation of mind by lovingkindness, make it our vehicle, make it our basis, stabilize it, exercise ourselves in it, and fully perfect it.’ Thus should you train yourselves.
  5. Radiate boundless love toward the entire world.
  6. Some do not understand that we must die. But those who do realize this settle their quarrels immediately.
  7. All conditioned things are impermanent’ — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering.
  8. Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by little, fills himself with good.
  9. Irrigators channel waters. Fletchers straighten arrows. Carpenters shape wood. The wise master themselves.
  10. Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal.
  11. The way is not in the sky. The way is in the heart.
  12. Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.
  13. If you understood the power of giving as I do, you would never let a meal pass without sharing.
  14. The root of suffering is attachment.
  15. The greats of the past only show the way. You must walk the path yourself.

Namaste, my friends, namaste!

Ray

Ray Davis is the founder of The Affirmation Spot. He’s been studying and practicing personal development for 30 years. He’s also studied many of the world’s spiritual traditions and mythologies.

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We Got To Have Peace – The Affirmation Spot for Saturday August 15, 2009

Ray’s Daily Affirmation:

“My world is what I make of it and I CHOOSE to make it a peaceful place to be. Your world is what you make of it and you choose to make it a happy place to be.”
(Choose from 100s mp3 affirmations at The Affirmation Spot)

Peace is an age-old dream of humanity. Yet our greed, our anger, and our need for control of our fellow human beings has led us often to kill, to steal, and to destroy. We need to get a clear understanding the violence and war are not givens for humanity. Peace is possible. PEACE IS A CHOICE.

Let’s be clear about that. When we don’t have peace (within ourselves or in the world) it is because we have failed to choose it. We have failed to think the thoughts and take the actions that would bring it about. We are snared by “Us” and “Them”…..”Me” and “Mine”.

Here a beautiful musical expression of these sentiments and this wisdom by the great Curtis Mayfield.

The great teachers have all implored us to achieve. Why not today?

“Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth… Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy… Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.” ~ Jesus (Matthew 5:5-9)

“Few know that our purpose in this world is to live in harmony. Those who become aware of this cease their quarrels immediately.” ~ Buddha (Dhammapada)

“The taking of one innocent life is like taking all of Mankind… and the saving of one life is like saving all of Mankind.” ~ Qur’an, 5:33.

“Peace is not merely a distant goal that we seek, but a means by which we arrive at that goal.” ~ Martin Luther King

“What is hurtful to yourself do not to your fellow man. That is the whole of the Torah and the remainder is but commentary.” ~ Talmud, Shabbat 31a

“Non-violence is not a garment to be put on and off at will. Its seat is in the heart, and it must be an inseparable part of our being.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

Stay inspired!

Ray

2009 Affirmation

“This year I am absolutely committed to being the person I came here to be!”

Buddha Quotations – The Affirmation Spot for Satruday May 16, 2009

Siddhartha Gotama – better known to the world as The Buddha – was born about 563 BCE in Nepal. Nepal was then a part of ancient India. He was born a prince, but gave up his wealth and status to pursue truth and enlightenment.

He has witnessed birth, sickness, old age, and death and wished to find a path whereby humans could escape this cycle of suffering.

After several years of searching and studying under various teachers, Siddhartha sat down beneath a Bodhi Tree. He determined not to move from that spot until he had attained absolute enlightenment.

Mara – the god of deception – appeared before the Buddha and sought divert him from his task. He tempted the Buddha with desire and tried to frighten him with fearful images. Siddhartha was not swayed and attained supreme enlightenment through his discovery of the famous “The Middle Way”.

Today’s video offers many of the Buddha’s most profound quotes. Whether you see these words as spiritual advice or just practical advice, is up to you. My hope is that everyone will find value in these beautiful words.

Stay inspired!

Ray

2009 Affirmation

“This year I am absolutely committed to being the person I came here to be!”

Metta: Turning Your Positivity Outward – The Affirmation Spot for Wednesday September 3, 2008

Step one in creating a positive world is to become more positive within. Our own ability to create a more peaceful, centered self helps us contribute that kind energy in the world. Step two is to radiate that positive energy out into the world. One ancient practice allows us to do both simultaneously.

Some of my readers may be familiar with the meditation practice known as Metta. Metta is a Pali word generally translated into English as “lovingkindness”. The word itself is derived from the ancient Sanskrit word Maitri.

Metta was first practiced by Buddhists, but the meditation has become popular with many other people for its ability to create a strong sense of well-being. While a standard seated position with legs crossed and back straight is recommended for meditation, you can easily do Metta sitting comfortably or even lying. Any position is fine as long as you can maintain focused attention.

Metta meditation is an active meditation. Its purpose is to develop positive mental states within and then expand those positive mental states out into the world in concentric circles. Metta meditation is believed to create a peaceful environment and well, for lack of a better phrase, “positive vibes” in an area.

The practice wisely recognizes that you cannot spread peace, love, or kindness into the world until you have created it within yourself. Metta meditation begins with the self. The meditator usually quietly repeats or thinks a phrase (an affirmation) similar to:

“May I be happy. May I be peaceful. May I be free from suffering.”

This continues until the meditator feels this assurance rising within. You want to continue until you reach the point where the phrase feels like:

“I AM happy. I AM peaceful. I AM free from suffering.”

If you are starting from a place of great distress in your life, you might spend several meditation sessions focused strictly bringing these feelings into reality for you. That’s OK. Keep at it and soon you will experience these feelings more rapidly.

Having developed a sense of peace and loving-kindness within; you are now ready to share it with the world. Next, you focus on the person closest to you in your life – a spouse, a child, a parent. This is because this person is the next easiest person for you to feel these feelings towards.

Transition to a phrase such as:

“May April be happy. May April be peaceful. May April be free from suffering.”

As you say these words about your loved one, feel yourself sending these feelings of affection to him or her as you visualize them. Move on when you feel you have completely embraced your loved one with these thoughts.

Repeat this process through the following stages:

  1. You
  2. Closest loved one (someone you love deeply)
  3. Friend (someone you feel positive towards)
  4. Acquaintance (neutral feelings towards)
  5. Difficult person (someone you have negative feelings towards)
  6. Enemy (someone you have strong negative feelings towards)
  7. The world

You can include as many people as you wish, but maintain at least this minimal pattern.

When you practice Metta regularly you begin to develop a more constant state of lovingkindness towards yourself and the world around you.

Back in my sales days, I used to include customers I knew I would be calling the next day. I cannot tell you how many times meetings, presentations, and closes went far more smoothly than expected after Metta meditations.

Metta is a way to take the positive you are developing within you and spread it out into the world. You may experience a new sense of peace for you, see old tensions with people in your life fade away, and even break down barriers with your most persistent “enemies”.

You might even use the practice to dispel negative thoughts and feelings or develop a greater capacity for acceptance.

I’m sharing this with you today because I have not practiced Metta regularly for several years. The benefits are so apparent I cannot imagine why. I am going to take up the practice and I hope you might consider it too. Along with affirmations, Metta brought me up from some pretty low times.

I know it can add value to your life and help you turn your positivity outward.

Follow your bliss. Experience your bliss. Become your bliss.

Ray

Ray Davis is the founder of The Affirmation Spot and an advocate for the potential of the human race.  He’s the author of the breakthrough novel Anunnaki Awakening: Revelation – order your signed copy today at AATrilogy.com

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Dhammapada Twin Verses – The Affirmation Spot for Friday July 11, 2008

The world we live in is full of promise, threat, and opportunity. As you look beneath the surface, you begin to understand that none of us is safe unless all of us are safe. None of us is free until each of us is free.

The challenges we face are of our own making and the solutions are within us. As Albert Einstein once said, “The world’s problems will not be solved by the level of thinking that created them.”

This is true on both the micro and macro levels. We need new thinking, better thinking. We need to empower ourselves and move in the direction of a bottom up world promoting individuality and decentralization. Top down and centralization approaches are not working. Violence is not working. Hatred is not working. Division is not working.

Interestingly, one of the most masterful expressions of this point of view is over 2500 years old.

The Buddhist Dhammapada is a book of collected sayings attributed to Buddha. The first chapter usually called Twin Verses says, in part, the following.

  1. We are the result of our thoughts. Our present thoughts create our future life. Our life is created by our mind. If a person speaks or acts with a mind grounded in fear suffering will follow him as surely as summer follows spring.
  2. We are the result of our thoughts. Our present thoughts create our future life. Our life is created by our mind. If a person speaks or acts with a mind grounded in love happiness will follow him as surely as his shadow never leaves him.
  3. ‘He offended me, he hurt me, he owes me, he took what was mine.’ Those who dwell on such thoughts will never be free from hate or find peace within.
  4. ‘He offended me, he hurt me, he owes me, he took what was mine.’ Those who dwell not on such thoughts shall be free from hate and find peace within.
  5. For hate only feeds on itself; but love overcomes hate. This is an Eternal Law.
  6. Few know that our purpose in this world is to live in harmony. Those who become aware of this cease their quarrels immediately.

We need a fresh reality. It begins with our thoughts. We need to think about what our thoughts create when they ripple out into the larger pond that is our world. To do otherwise, leaves us more susceptible to the threatening aspects of our world and less able to access the promise and the opportunity.

The good news is we get to choose.

Stay inspired!

Ray